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Multidimensional Child Poverty Measurement

The workshop will help to institutionalize child sensitive national development through evidenced based policy processes.

Paramaribo, Suriname - 15-17 Nov 2016

Description

The most commonly used method to measure poverty is based on per capita income, spending or consumption levels. This means that persons are considered poor if their consumption, expenditure or income levels fall below a minimum level deemed necessary to meet their basic needs. Such measures offer a broad understanding of populations living in poverty, and can be part of building evidence about children living in poverty, however they provide a limited picture of child poverty and disparities which are better measured based on the actual deprivations children may face.  For example, deprivations a child faces in one household or family may not be the same as those faced by a child in another family with the same income and consumption level; in addition, a child could face deprivations while other household members (including other children) are not affected.

Measurement of multidimensional poverty, and especially of child poverty, is not only a moral obligation but also has an economic rationale when human capital development is dependent on the wellbeing of children and adolescents. Indeed, child poverty is not only a measure of what is happening to society’s most vulnerable members, but also one of the most important indicators of a nation’s future socio-economic well-being.

Child poverty and disparity analysis will inform the development of inclusive policies concerned not only with child safety and security, but also with health, education, living conditions and social protection. Policies which address multidimensional poverty and its impact on children will also contribute to implementing Agenda 2030.

Against this backdrop, the objectives of the workshop will be:

  • Support the Government in defining a multidimensional child poverty measure (and/or one for the overall population) in accordance with the global definition of SDG indicators
  • Build capacity of the Government in the measurement and analysis of multidimensional poverty
  • Support the Government in generating disaggregated data and evidence on the well-being of children, specifically multi-dimensional poverty and disparities.

Programme

Time/Venue

Session

Resource Person

Day 1

8:00-8:30

Registration

 

 

8:30-8:45

Welcome and Opening Remarks

  • Director of General Bureau of Statistics
  • UNICEF- Surinam/Guyana rep.
  •  
  • UNICEF- Regional Office/ Social Policy Advisor
  •  
  • ECLAC Rep.

 

Mr. Iwan Sno

Mr. Paolo Marchi

Mr. Joaquin Gonzales-Aleman

Guillermo Sunkel

8:45-9:00

Introduction

  • Objectives of the 3-day Workshop
  • Expectations of participants

 

 

Guillermo Sunkel

Participants

9:00-10:15

Background

  • Poverty and its measurement: importance and policy implications
  • Review of main approaches (monetary/multidimensional; direct/indirect; objective/subjective, absolute/relative, etc.)

 

Guillermo Sunkel

 

10:15-10:30

Tea or coffee break

 

10:30-12:00

Monetary method

  • Main characteristics of monetary method and its variants (variable that represents wellbeing, food basket costs, Orshansky coefficient, equivalence scales, hybrid lines, etc.)

 

  • Income/spending/consumption measures and multidimensional methods: complementary of substitutive?

Francis Jones

12:00-13:00

Lunch Break

 

13:00-14:00

 

 

  • Sustainable Development Goals: recent discussion about monitoring indicators
  • Measurement of multiple deprivations and linkage to public policy (general)
  • Overview of the origins of multidimensional child poverty measurement: Bristol’s World Study, rights approach and regional study of child poverty (Latin America and the Caribbean)

 

Guillermo Sunkel

14:00-14:50

 

 

  • Multidimensional measures: theory and practice
  • Math approaches

 

Francis Jones – Ernesto Espíndola

14:50-15:00

Conclusion Day 1

 

Mr. Joaquin Gonzales-Aleman

 

Time/Venue

Session

Resource Person

 

Day 2

8:00-9:00

Overview of stages / steps for creating an index of multiple deprivations: selection of information sources (and differences between them), dimensions and variables (and complex / simple indicators), and defining the levels of deprivation. Weighting of dimensions and/or indicators

Ernesto Espíndola

9:00-10:15

  • Dimensions, indicators, thresholds
  • Main examples (including ECLAC-UNICEF study)

Guillermo Sunkel - Ernesto Espíndola

10:15-10:30

Tea of coffee break

 

10:30-12:00

 

 

  • Aggregation in multidimensional child poverty measurement: headcount ratio, intensity, depth, and severity
  • Index family and Sen’s axioms

Ernesto Espíndola

12:00-13:00

Lunch Break

 

13:00-14:50

 

 

  • Key methodological decisions in international comparative experience.
  • Main theoretical and methodological decisions, their effects in results and usefulness/implications for public policy

Guillermo Sunkel

14:50-15:00

Conclusion day 2

Xxx (Unicef)

15-17 Nov 2016
Meetings and technical symposiums
Krasnapolsky Hotel
Domineestraat 39
Paramaribo
Suriname
By invitation

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